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Life of General Thomas Pinckney Charles Cotesworth Pinckney

Life of General Thomas Pinckney

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230204765
Paperback
60 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ... DIPLOMATIC. THE ENGLISHMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ... DIPLOMATIC. THE ENGLISH MISSION. 1792-1796. Hitherto we have traced Thomas Pinckneys career through the armed struggle with Great Britain, and his duties as governor of the State. We must now follow him to the field of diplomacy, where the results of the Revolutionary contest were to be worked out. Though Major Pinckney declined the offer of a seat on the federal bench, he could not long indulge his taste for private life. In 1791 he was nominated by Washington to the responsible position of minister to London. The United States had had no representative in England since the inauguration of the federal government. John Adams had been sent to England in 1785, to represent the Continental Congress. Gouverneur Morris was an informal diplomatic agent for a short time, without powers. But no minister had yet been accredited to the English court. The American people had no desire for closer intercourse with their recent foes. On the other hand, the king, the court, and the nation, all were still deeply irritated against their revolted colonies. An ambassador from the United States could only be the envoy of an upstart nation, representing successful resistance to authority. Grave doubts existed among our statesmen as to the expediency of any such appointment, as the debates in the Cabinet and in Congress prove. Mr. Jefferson strongly opposed the mission, on the ground that it would be a mere waste of money to appoint any minister to the Court of St. James during this reign (George III.)- and many others thought that the time had not yet come for any friendly advances on our part. But Washingtons dispassionate judgment came to a different conclusion. He determined to establish the mission, and selected Thomas Pinckney to fill it. The...