Home » The Knowledge Of God And The Service Of God According To The Teaching Of The Reformation, Recalling The Scottish Confession Of 1560 by Karl Barth
The Knowledge Of God And The Service Of God According To The Teaching Of The Reformation, Recalling The Scottish Confession Of 1560 Karl Barth

The Knowledge Of God And The Service Of God According To The Teaching Of The Reformation, Recalling The Scottish Confession Of 1560

Karl Barth

Published
ISBN : 9780404604950
Hardcover
255 pages
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 About the Book 

I find myself unable to give this book more than 3 stars out of 5, not because this book is a mediocre writing. On the contrary, Barth gives a scholarly exposition of the Confession of the Scottish Reformation churches. It is an extremely interesting and well-presented exposition of this confession. However, this book is the collection of lectures that Karl Barth presented as his Gifford Lectures. The purpose of the Gifford Lectures is that Natural Theology be explained such that people of all races and social status should be able to understand it. As such, I can only express my disappointment in that Karl Barth only discusses Natural Theology in a small number of places, those places where the Scottish reformed confession seems to disagree with tenets of Natural Theology.I found that Karl Barths understanding of Natural Theology was marginal. He is, by his own admission, an opponent of Natural Theology- however, the version of Natural Theology that he opposes is itself marginal. He proposes that Reformation theology is the anti-thesis and sworn enemy of Natural Theology, even though he admits that some of the first reformers did, themselves, engage in forms of Natural theology. It is my personal opinion that this book does not advance either the case against Natural Theology, nor the case for Natural Theology. Those who engage in Natural Theology may continue as if this book was never written, and those who are against Natural Theology would be better off not using this book as a reference.Aside from the fact that this book is worthless as far as the debate for or against Natural Theology is concerned, it is a wonderful exposition of Reformed Theology based upon the Confession of the Reformed Churches of Scotland. It has many pearls in it, and is valuable as a commentary on Reformed Theology.